Layering Clothes: The T9 Guide to Staying Warm When the Temps Get Low

women snowshoeing in New Zealand

The key to staying comfortable, whatever the weather? It’s all about that layer. Layering clothing well takes a little prep work, but don’t sweat it—we’ve got all the layering basics you need to know to stay warm, dry and rock any winter adventure that comes your way.


Why Layer Clothes?

Layering clothing for winter helps keep us feeling just right, no matter the forecast—layers can keep us from being too chilled at the beginning of our workout or too hot in the middle. How to layer clothes is individual to every person (layers=our own personal thermostat) but once you get the basics, it’s a handy little skill that’ll come in useful again and again.

BACK TO TOP


How Do I Layer Clothes For Fall & Winter?

Whether you’re slaying the slopes or just sneaking in a quick hike, there are three main components to layering clothing for winter:

Base Layer: 
a snug-fitting, sweat-wicking foundation piece.
Mid Layer: 
an insulating piece (or two) to keep us toasty.
Outer Layer: 
a water-resistant or water-proof shell that protects us from the elements.

Each of these layering pieces work together to keep you going when the temps drop. Read on to get essential tips on how to pick the best layering clothes for winter.

base layer, mid layer, outer layer

BACK TO TOP


Base Layers Keep Us Dry

What is a base layer?

A base layer is just like it sounds—an undershirt or a bottom layer you put on first, so it’s the layer that’s most in contact with your skin. Its main job is to wick away sweat so your skin stays dry. This super important piece of the layering puzzle often gets left behind, but without good base layers and long underwear, you’re pretty much destined to be a sweaty, soggy (and when it’s cold outside, soggy=chilly) mess.

What should you look for in a base layer?

Keep it Snug: For a base layer to work their wicking magic, it has to be in contact with your skin, so a snug fit is best.

Know your Goods: Ditch the scratchies and look for quality materials that wick away moisture and are comfy to the touch.

• Merino Wool Base Layers: 
Forget your granny’s itchy wool, Merino wool underwear are top performing base layers when it comes to being wicking, stink-proof and ultra-cozy.
• Synthetic Base Layers:
Durable and easy to find, long underwear made out of polyester, nylon, spandex (or a combo) are super-wicking, comfortably stretchy and odor resistant enough to go days between washing.

Choose Your Weight: Base layers and women’s long underwear come in different weights, from light to heavy. While the best base layer weight for your activity is really up to you, remember: your base layer’s job isn’t to keep you warm—it’s to keep you dry. Deciding between a couple pairs of long underwear? We’ll always recommend going with lighter weight but better wicking. Leave the insulation to the mid layers!

BACK TO TOP


Mid layers: Keep us warm

What is a mid layer?

The job of a mid layer is to trap our body heat, keeping us warm, even when it’s freezing. How well your middle layer insulates is a huge factor in how you feel during your workout—too much insulation and you’ll be sweating before you start. Too little, and you’ll get a bad case of the shivers (or way worse, hypothermia).

What should you look for in a mid layer?

Know Your Temps: Check that forecast and insulate to match. Frigid temps call for high-tech insulating materials like a down vest or jacket, but if it’s just chilly, adding a thin fleece to the mix may just do the trick.

Layer Your Layers: Your mid layers don’t have to be just one layer. Keep in mind what you want to do and how warm you might get, and layer accordingly. Just a bit cool? Stock up on layering tees or long sleeve shirts. All day snow play? Add on women’s jackets and vests or women’s sweaters.

Check Out That Booty: Don’t leave your bottom half out in the cold—women’s pants range in thickness and warmth, so put some thought into your pant choice so your legs and booty get the warmth they need, too.

Know Your Goods: Materials matter, so make sure your mid layer matches your adventure (and the forecast).

• Fleece: 
A great lightweight mid layer, fleece keeps you warm, stays breathable, and dries fast. Make sure you put a wind blocking outer layer in the mix though—otherwise you’ll feel every little breeze that comes your way.
• Down: 
The queen of insulating materials, women’s down vests and jackets pack down small and insulate the best. Down can be pricey, but a quality down jacket can make the difference between joy and misery on the slopes.
• Synthetic: 
While synthetics aren’t quite as insulating as down, they’ll keep you warm even when damp—a great option when rain or snow is on the horizon.

Double Duty: Many women’s jackets and vests have an outer shell that has some wind and rain resistance built in. For quick adventures in not-so-extreme weather, a quality down or synthetic jacket on top of a base layer or long sleeve shirt might be all the layering mojo you need.

BACK TO TOP


Outer Layers: Keep us Protected

What is an outer layer?

Your outer layer is the piece that’s exposed to the elements. Ideally, it’s also the piece that keeps the elements out, and you nice and toasty inside. Most outer layers consist of a water-resistant or water-proof shell jacket designed to be worn over an insulating mid layer. (Sometimes combo jackets are sold with a soft outer shell and removable insulating mid layer. These can be great options if you feel like both pieces are right for your activity.)

What should you look for in an outer layer?

Keep Breathing: Sure waterproof might sound like a good idea, but most waterproof or windproof shell jackets aren’t breathable, which means all that sweat you’re creating has nowhere to go. Look for water-resistance and breathability in a shell jacket to stay comfortable during a workout.

Consider your Cash: There’s a huge range of costs in outer layers, from simple shell jackets to expedition-level gear. Our advice? Figure out what type of outer layer you’ll get the most use out of, and what works for the activities you’re doing. Then buy the highest quality one you can afford.

Make it Rain: Make sure your outer layer is treated with a water repellant. Instead of soaking in, rain should roll right off.

BACK TO TOP


What’s the Best Layering for my Cool Weather Sport?

When it comes down to it, your layering game is a very personal one, but here at T9 we’ve got some tried and true tricks to keeping comfy when we’re out conquering our own winter wonderlands.

women snowshoeing on a mountain
woman running wearing a vest

Winter Hiking:

What to look for:

Winter Running:

What to look for:

Skiing:

What to look for:

  • Ski base layers that wick sweat while helping keep us warm.
  • Water-resistant women’s pants and outer shell jackets to keep wipeouts from sticking with us.
  • Layering tees and long sleeve t-shirt styles that are easy to take off or add on.
  • Women’s sweater styles that include merino wool for lightweight insulation that adjusts to your body temperature while keeping odor at bay.

BACK TO TOP


TOP PICKS: LAYERING CLOTHES FOR WINTER

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Layering Clothes: The T9 Guide to Staying Warm When the Temps Get Low

women snowshoeing in New Zealand

The key to staying comfortable, whatever the weather? It’s all about that layer. Layering clothing well takes a little prep work, but don’t sweat it—we’ve got all the layering basics you need to know to stay warm, dry and rock any winter adventure that comes your way.


Why Layer Clothes?

Layering clothing for winter helps keep us feeling just right, no matter the forecast—layers can keep us from being too chilled at the beginning of our workout or too hot in the middle. How to layer clothes is individual to every person (layers=our own personal thermostat) but once you get the basics, it’s a handy little skill that’ll come in useful again and again.

BACK TO TOP


How Do I Layer Clothes For Fall & Winter?

Whether you’re slaying the slopes or just sneaking in a quick hike, there are three main components to layering clothing for winter:

Base Layer: 
a snug-fitting, sweat-wicking foundation piece.
Mid Layer: 
an insulating piece (or two) to keep us toasty.
Outer Layer: 
a water-resistant or water-proof shell that protects us from the elements.

Each of these layering pieces work together to keep you going when the temps drop. Read on to get essential tips on how to pick the best layering clothes for winter.

base layer, mid layer, outer layer

BACK TO TOP


Base Layers Keep Us Dry

What is a base layer?

A base layer is just like it sounds—an undershirt or a bottom layer you put on first, so it’s the layer that’s most in contact with your skin. Its main job is to wick away sweat so your skin stays dry. This super important piece of the layering puzzle often gets left behind, but without good base layers and long underwear, you’re pretty much destined to be a sweaty, soggy (and when it’s cold outside, soggy=chilly) mess.

What should you look for in a base layer?

Keep it Snug: For a base layer to work their wicking magic, it has to be in contact with your skin, so a snug fit is best.

Know your Goods: Ditch the scratchies and look for quality materials that wick away moisture and are comfy to the touch.

• Merino Wool Base Layers: 
Forget your granny’s itchy wool, Merino wool underwear are top performing base layers when it comes to being wicking, stink-proof and ultra-cozy.
• Synthetic Base Layers:
Durable and easy to find, long underwear made out of polyester, nylon, spandex (or a combo) are super-wicking, comfortably stretchy and odor resistant enough to go days between washing.

Choose Your Weight: Base layers and women’s long underwear come in different weights, from light to heavy. While the best base layer weight for your activity is really up to you, remember: your base layer’s job isn’t to keep you warm—it’s to keep you dry. Deciding between a couple pairs of long underwear? We’ll always recommend going with lighter weight but better wicking. Leave the insulation to the mid layers!

BACK TO TOP


Mid layers: Keep us warm

What is a mid layer?

The job of a mid layer is to trap our body heat, keeping us warm, even when it’s freezing. How well your middle layer insulates is a huge factor in how you feel during your workout—too much insulation and you’ll be sweating before you start. Too little, and you’ll get a bad case of the shivers (or way worse, hypothermia).

What should you look for in a mid layer?

Know Your Temps: Check that forecast and insulate to match. Frigid temps call for high-tech insulating materials like a down vest or jacket, but if it’s just chilly, adding a thin fleece to the mix may just do the trick.

Layer Your Layers: Your mid layers don’t have to be just one layer. Keep in mind what you want to do and how warm you might get, and layer accordingly. Just a bit cool? Stock up on layering tees or long sleeve shirts. All day snow play? Add on women’s jackets and vests or women’s sweaters.

Check Out That Booty: Don’t leave your bottom half out in the cold—women’s pants range in thickness and warmth, so put some thought into your pant choice so your legs and booty get the warmth they need, too.

Know Your Goods: Materials matter, so make sure your mid layer matches your adventure (and the forecast).

• Fleece: 
A great lightweight mid layer, fleece keeps you warm, stays breathable, and dries fast. Make sure you put a wind blocking outer layer in the mix though—otherwise you’ll feel every little breeze that comes your way.
• Down: 
The queen of insulating materials, women’s down vests and jackets pack down small and insulate the best. Down can be pricey, but a quality down jacket can make the difference between joy and misery on the slopes.
• Synthetic: 
While synthetics aren’t quite as insulating as down, they’ll keep you warm even when damp—a great option when rain or snow is on the horizon.

Double Duty: Many women’s jackets and vests have an outer shell that has some wind and rain resistance built in. For quick adventures in not-so-extreme weather, a quality down or synthetic jacket on top of a base layer or long sleeve shirt might be all the layering mojo you need.

BACK TO TOP


Outer Layers: Keep us Protected

What is an outer layer?

Your outer layer is the piece that’s exposed to the elements. Ideally, it’s also the piece that keeps the elements out, and you nice and toasty inside. Most outer layers consist of a water-resistant or water-proof shell jacket designed to be worn over an insulating mid layer. (Sometimes combo jackets are sold with a soft outer shell and removable insulating mid layer. These can be great options if you feel like both pieces are right for your activity.)

What should you look for in an outer layer?

Keep Breathing: Sure waterproof might sound like a good idea, but most waterproof or windproof shell jackets aren’t breathable, which means all that sweat you’re creating has nowhere to go. Look for water-resistance and breathability in a shell jacket to stay comfortable during a workout.

Consider your Cash: There’s a huge range of costs in outer layers, from simple shell jackets to expedition-level gear. Our advice? Figure out what type of outer layer you’ll get the most use out of, and what works for the activities you’re doing. Then buy the highest quality one you can afford.

Make it Rain: Make sure your outer layer is treated with a water repellant. Instead of soaking in, rain should roll right off.

BACK TO TOP


What’s the Best Layering for my Cool Weather Sport?

When it comes down to it, your layering game is a very personal one, but here at T9 we’ve got some tried and true tricks to keeping comfy when we’re out conquering our own winter wonderlands.

women snowshoeing on a mountain
woman running wearing a vest

Winter Hiking:

What to look for:

Winter Running:

What to look for:

Skiing:

What to look for:

  • Ski base layers that wick sweat while helping keep us warm.
  • Water-resistant women’s pants and outer shell jackets to keep wipeouts from sticking with us.
  • Layering tees and long sleeve t-shirt styles that are easy to take off or add on.
  • Women’s sweater styles that include merino wool for lightweight insulation that adjusts to your body temperature while keeping odor at bay.

BACK TO TOP


TOP PICKS: LAYERING CLOTHES FOR WINTER
Crash 2.0 Polartec Tights - Striated Crash 2.0 Polartec Tights - Striated
Crash 2.0 Polartec Tights - Striated: New Color Badge
$99
Spark 2.0 Leggings - Solid Spark 2.0 Leggings - Solid
Spark 2.0 Leggings - Solid: New Color Badge
$49
Grace 2.0 Long Sleeve Top - Ink Dot Grace 2.0 Long Sleeve Top - Ink Dot
Grace 2.0 Long Sleeve Top - Ink Dot: New Badge
$69
Grace 2.0 Long Sleeve - Solid Grace 2.0 Long Sleeve - Solid
Grace 2.0 Long Sleeve - Solid: New Color Badge
$65 $52 - $65
Quintessential Cami Top Quintessential Cami Top
Quintessential Cami Top: New Color Badge
$35
Spark 2.0 Leggings - Herringbone Spark 2.0 Leggings - Herringbone
Spark 2.0 Leggings - Herringbone: New Color Badge
$54
Passport Skirt - Herringbone Passport Skirt - Herringbone
Passport Ponte Skirt - Herringbone: New Badge
$89
Eighth Day 2.0 Tights Eighth Day 2.0 Tights
Eighth Day 2.0 Tights: New Color Badge
$69
Vital Full Zip Hoodie - Solid Vital Full Zip Hoodie - Solid
Vital Full Zip Hoodie - Solid: New Color Badge
$99
Snow Slayer 2.0 Pants Snow Slayer 2.0 Pants
Snow Slayer 2.0 Pants: New Color Badge
$129
Super Power 1/4 Zip Sweater - Woodcut Botanical Super Power 1/4 Zip Sweater - Woodcut Botanical
Super Power 1/4 Zip Sweater - Woodcut Botanical: New Badge
$129
That's A Wrap Skirt That's A Wrap Skirt
That's a Wrap Skirt: New Badge
$99
Mount Diablo Fleece Vest Mount Diablo Fleece Vest
Mount Diablo Fleece Vest: New Badge
$110
Hibernation Hoodie Sweatshirt Dress Hibernation Hoodie Sweatshirt Dress
Hibernation Hooded Sweatshirt Dress: New Badge
$109
Super Power Full Zip Sweater Super Power Full Zip Sweater
Super Power Full Zip Sweater: New Badge
$149
Circadian Leggings Circadian Leggings
Circadian Leggings: New Color Badge
$80
Valkyrie Pants - Regular Valkyrie Pants - Regular
$119
Mover Maker Tunic Sweater Mover Maker Tunic Sweater
Mover Maker Tunic Sweater: New Badge
$149
Wings Out Long Sleeve Top Wings Out Long Sleeve Top
$68
Super Power Skirt - Woodcut Botanical Super Power Skirt - Woodcut Botanical
Super Power Skirt - Woodcut Botanical: New Badge
$99
Passport Dress 2.0 - Solid Passport Dress 2.0 - Solid
She Leads Zip Front Dress: New Badge
$99
Most Wanted Pullover Most Wanted Pullover
Most Wanted Hoodie: New Badge
$119
Crash 2.0 Polartec Jacket Crash 2.0 Polartec Jacket
$149
La Exploradora Fleece Jacket La Exploradora Fleece Jacket
La Exploradora Fleece Jacket: New Badge
$100
Cold Killer 2.0 Pants - Regular Cold Killer 2.0 Pants - Regular
$109
Kestrel Vest Kestrel Vest
Kestrel Vest: New Badge
$130
Get Out There Joggers Get Out There Joggers
Get Out There Joggers: New Badge
$89
Unlikely Hiking Tights Unlikely Hiking Tights
$80
Algebra Leggings Algebra Leggings
Algebra Leggings: New Badge
$89
Mount Diablo Fleece Jacket Mount Diablo Fleece Jacket
Mount Diablo Fleece Jacket: New Badge
$150
Backcountry Hotpants Insulated Pants Backcountry Hotpants Insulated Pants
$189
Flash Lite Jacket Flash Lite Jacket
$130
Trinity Plus Moto Jacket Trinity Plus Moto Jacket
Trinity Plus Moto Jacket: New Badge
$129
Ascent 2.0 Tights Ascent 2.0 Tights
$99
Flip Turn Reversible Fleece Jacket Flip Turn Reversible Fleece Jacket
Flip Turn Reversible Fleece Jacket: New Badge
$158
Must-Have Hoodie Must-Have Hoodie
$140
Wonder Woman Long Sleeve Top - Print Wonder Woman Long Sleeve Top - Print
Wonder Woman Long Sleeve Top - Print: New Color Badge
$110
Deluge Eco Rain Jacket Deluge Eco Rain Jacket
Deluge Eco Rain Jacket: New Badge
$120
Aviatrix Long Sleeve Pocket Tee Aviatrix Long Sleeve Pocket Tee
Aviatrix Long Sleeve Pocket Tee: New Color Badge
$60 $49 - $60
Wonder Woman Long Sleeve Top - Solid Wonder Woman Long Sleeve Top - Solid
Price reduced from $100 to $79
Nonjohns Winter Hiking Pants Nonjohns Winter Hiking Pants
Price reduced from $99 to $79
Thunder Training Tights Thunder Training Tights
Price reduced from $120 to $99
Code Cracker Tights - Print Code Cracker Tights - Print
Price reduced from $74 to $49
Mighty Tunic Mighty Tunic
Price reduced from $109 to $79
Epic Hoodie Epic Hoodie
Epic Hoodie: New Color Badge
$95
First Mile Funnel Neck Pullover First Mile Funnel Neck Pullover
Price reduced from $78 to $59
Training Day Quarter Zip Pullover Training Day Quarter Zip Pullover
Price reduced from $60 to $49
She Leads Tunic She Leads Tunic
Price reduced from $119 to $72